CONCERTGEBOUW SERIES
BRAHMS:  Piano Concerto No. 2 in B Flat, Op. 83. (Emil Gilels, pianist)
 HINDEMITH:  Mathis der Maler.
Amsterdam Concertgebouw Orch/Eugen Jochum, cond.

AUDIOPHILE CLASSICS APL 101.545 (F)  (ADD) TT:  76:35

MOZART:  Symphony No. 25 in G Minor, K. 183.  MAHLER:  Lieder eines 
fahrenden Gesellen (
Hermann Schey, baritone).  DE FALLA:  Nights in the
Gardens of Spain 
(Willem Andreissen, pianist).  BARTÓK:  Viola Concerto
(William Primrose, viola) Amsterdam Concertgebouw Orch/Otto Klemperer, cond.

AUDIOPHILE CLASSICS APL101.547 (F) (ADD)  TT:  72:02

The Klemperer CD is a rather strange compilation of enormous interest.  These live recordings from 1947/1951 represent his
earlier career when he "kept things moving." His March 29, 1951 performance of de Falla's Nights in the Gardens of Spain 
with Dutch pianist/composer Willem Andriessen as soloist finds him surprisingly well attuned to Spanish rhythms.  This Mozart
Symphony 25 is rough and ready, with more orchestral mishaps than one would expect from the famed Dutch orchestra, but it
surely is exciting. Hermann Schey is disappointing as baritone soloist in Mahler's song cycle from a concert December 4, 1947.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                Of greatest interest here is the January 10 , 1951 performance of Bartók's Viola Concerto with William Primrose as soloist. 
Primrose had asked the composer in 1944 for a concerto; although Bartók began work on it immediately, he never finished it. 
The scorewas completed by the composer's friend Tibor Serly from a sketch of the first movement plus bits and pieces of
fragments.  Doubtless the concerto is equal parts of Bartók and Serly but it does have a Bartókian sound and is considered to be
a major entry in the limited viola concerto repertory.  There is a sense of occasion in this strong live recording which took place
about two years after Primrose gave the world premiere in Minneapolis in 1949.

The other CD is valuable particularly for the Brahms concerto performance about a year after Gilels and Jochum made their
recording for DGG with the Berlin Philharmonic.  Previously this performance was available via a superb TAHRA set, with the
question is it the same performance?  The recording dates are the same, but the blurb on the second horn call of
the first movement heard on the Tahra set is not on the Audiophile Classics. How can this be explained? The Tahra set is the
one to have, if you can find it, as it is in glorious stereo, with a richer sound than what is heard on the AC disk. Mathis der Maler is
another specialty of Jochum's, also once available in another TAHRA set now discontinued.

Fine sound throughout on the AC CD, obviously directly from the Radio Nederland tapes(although as mentioned, the TAHRA
Brahms Second sounds better), and highly recommended.

R.E.B.